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How to Change the World review – the psychedelic birth of Greenpeace

An appealing account of the audacious – and charming – environmental activists who began by challenging a nuclear test off Alaska

“I think a few people were a bit on the psychedelic side,” says an interviewee recalling drugs dropped on a whaling island in this doc about how a bunch of hippies, yippies and environmentalists started Greenpeace. Psychedelic is an apt word for this brimming collage of original footage, new material, photographs and trippy, hand-scratched Stan Brakhage-style animation.

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Source: Guardian Environment

Shell leaves climate project it helped set up amid Arctic drilling row

Campaign against Shell’s drilling off coast of Alaska leads to company’s exit from Prince of Wales’s Corporate Leader Group

Shell has been forced to leave a Prince of Wales climate change project which it helped found after a row over the oil company’s controversial drilling programme in the Arctic.

The departure from the Prince of Wales’s Corporate Leader Group is another embarrassing setback for the oil and gas company, which has been battling to preserve its reputation in the face of a vociferous and growing campaign against its operations in the Chukchi Sea off the coast of Alaska.

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Source: Guardian Environment

Huge pirate tuna fishing operation in Pacific, says Greenpeace – video

Greenpeace says it has uncovered a large illegal tuna fishing operation in the waters of Papua New Guinea after apprehending a Taiwanese ship with 75kg of shark fins. Irregularities in the ships log book raised activists’ suspicions and they later found that the Shuen De Ching No.888 had no fishing licence for the area

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Source: Guardian Environment

This is not the island you're looking for, Irish wildlife groups tell Star Wars

Film crews for episode eight of the franchise set to return to Skellig Michael, as Irish government hopes island’s film appearance will boost tourism

Far, far away at the western end of the Irish “universe” a battle has commenced between rebels determined to save a small corner of their planet and the all-powerful empire.

An Taisce, the National Trust for Ireland, has accused the Irish government of “going to the dark side” by handing over once more a remote island off the coast of Kerry, home to bird species including puffins, peregrine falcons and guillemots, to the Star Wars franchise.

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Source: Guardian Environment

Southern Ocean showing 'remarkable' revival in carbon absorption ability

Unexpected findings show oceans’ potential to absorb CO2 fluctuates more over time than previously thought, researchers say

The Southern Ocean, which acts as one of the natural world’s most effective sponges for absorbing carbon dioxide, is showing signs of an unexpected revival in its ability to do so, according to scientists.

The oceans absorb around a quarter of emissions caused by human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, reducing the speed of climate change. About 40% of this occurs in the Southern Ocean, which surrounds the Antarctic, making it the planet’s strongest ocean carbon sink.

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Source: Guardian Environment

Earth songs: what are the best tracks about the environment?

Sean Paul and co’s Love Song To the Earth has brought green pop back in from the cold. But can the genre ever surpass Michael Jackson’s eternal question: ‘What about elephants?’

Unlike such familiar pop-song tropes as love, hate and dead pets, songwriters face a particularly tricky challenge when it comes to penning an earnest song about the environment. After all, what rhymes with fracking? Morally lacking? Financial backing? Twacking?

Perhaps that’s why the rather unlikely writing team of Toby Gad, John Shanks, Natasha Bedingfield and Sean Paul have enlisted some big name artists to provide vocals: Paul McCartney, Jon Bon Jovi, Sheryl Crow and Fergie all appear on Love Song to the Earth, a song written as part of a global campaign to raise awareness prior to the United Nations Climate Change Conference that takes place in Paris this December.

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Source: Guardian Environment

California University divests $200m from coal and tar sands holdings

Stricter regulation and drop in global demand made investments too risky, says university’s chief investment officer

The University of California has sold off $200m (£130m) of coal and oil sand investments from its $98bn investment fund less than a year after initially refusing to do so.

In September of last year, the university’s board of regents chief investment officer Jagdeep Singh Bachner refused to sell off the holdings, arguing that a more “holistic approach” than divestment was needed.

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Source: Guardian Environment

Flooding in Bangladesh – in pictures

People living on small islands in the country’s Kurigram district have been left homeless after floods hit for the second time in a month. At least 21 people have died in floods and landslides triggered by heavy rains in 2015. With downpours swelling rivers and flooding roads, many villagers are starving due to lack of food, relief goods and drinking water

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Source: Guardian Environment

Desmond Tutu's climate petition tops 300,000 signatures

Petition calls on US president Barack Obama and UN chief Ban Ki-Moon to help create a world run 100% on renewable energy

A petition launched by Desmond Tutu urging global leaders to create a world run 100% on renewables within 35 years has been backed by more than 300,000 people globally.

It describes climate change as “one of the greatest moral challenges of our time”.

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Source: Guardian Environment

BP, EDF and Procter & Gamble face pressure over climate change lobbying

Investors have written to corporate members of influential EU trade lobby groups accused of undermining action on climate change

A group of 25 investors with €61bn in assets has written to a number of FTSE 100 companies, including BP, EDF, Glencore, Johnson Matthey, Procter & Gamble, Rio Tinto, Statoil and Total asking them to justify their membership of prominent EU trade associations.

The letter, coordinated by responsible investment charity ShareAction, sets out a number of concerns about the lobbying activities of these trade groups on EU climate policy, based on research my colleagues and I carried out earlier this year. We investigated eight influential trade associations including BusinessEurope, which has argued that EU climate targets undermine industrial competitiveness, and the European Chemical Industry Council (Cefic), which has stated that strengthening the EU emissions trading system would force businesses to move overseas because of high energy costs in Europe.

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Source: Guardian Environment