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Dr Now: the smartphone app that puts you in touch with a GP – for a fee

New health apps exploit gaps in overstretched NHS by offering subscribers virtual consultation with a GP

A UK tech firm is offering video consultations with doctors via mobile phone, in a bid to repeat the success of British startup apps such as Hailo and Just Eat in which a taxi or a meal is a phone-tap away.

With the NHS under growing strain, the Liverpool-based start-up, called Dr Now, is targeting its new mobile app at tech-savvy people who don’t want to wait for an appointment with a GP, as well as businesses looking to save sickness-related costs.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

Greece braces for busy day's trading as Athens stock market reopens

Shares expected to sell off sharply when trading in Greek stocks resumes on Monday after a five-week shutdown

Greek investors expect a tumultuous day’s trading when Athens’ stock market reopens on Monday after a five-week shutdown.

The resumption of trading in Greek stocks will be the latest step back towards economic normality, after the prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, struck a deal with the country’s creditors to open talks on an €86bn (£61bn) third bailout.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

Interest rates: economists and homeowners brace for Super Thursday

Bank of England to reveal key interest rate decision, discussions behind it and quarterly economic forecasts on same day for first time

Britain’s mortgage borrowers will be warned this week to brace themselves for higher interest rates on what City of London traders have dubbed “Super Thursday”.

At least two, perhaps three, of the nine members of the Bank of England’s interest rate-setting committee are expected to cast their votes for a rate rise.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

Next banks £170m in interest charges from shoppers

The huge profits made on clothing retailer’s online and Next Directory catalogue credit service were found in small print of accounts

Next, one of Britain’s biggest high street retailers, banked almost £170m in interest charges last year from shoppers using its online and catalogue credit service.

The windfall highlights how the company has used the Next Directory service to become one of the biggest players in the clothing industry. However, it could also prompt accusations of double standards against its chief executive, Lord Wolfson, a Conservative peer who earlier this year called the living wage “irrelevant” and warned of a squeeze on household incomes since the financial crisis.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

UK interest rate rises – waiting for lift-off

To gauge how high interest rates will go, and how fast, we need to understand how fiscal and monetary policy interact, writes Gavin Kelly

With prominent members of the Bank of England’s monetary policy committee (MPC) – not least the governor – lining up in recent weeks to talk up the prospect of rate rises at some point in the coming months, this week’s meeting has already sparked another burst of speculation about when the first hike in eight years will happen.

Whatever your take on the exact timings of monetary lift-off – whether you’d opt for August or April – the far more important issue is the medium-term path of increases that follow.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

RBS, why the rush to sell it off?

George Osborne has everything in place to sell off RBS – it’s just that the taxpayer does not need to

Sir Philip Hampton said the results released by Royal Bank of Scotland last week were like “groundhog day”. The bank’s outgoing chairman was referring to the fact that decent growth in operating profits was wiped out by a string of charges for past misdeeds. It also feels like groundhog day for watchers of Britain’s bailed-out financial institutions: this time two years ago, the City was fixated on the possible timing of the first disposal of government shares in Lloyds Banking Group.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

Big Tech's big problem – its role in rising inequality

More profits need to be redirected away from shareholders and reinvested in plant, process and people if technology is not to exacerbate inequality

Look around and it seems pretty obvious that technology has made daily life easier.

We can watch almost any film or listen to any song at the press of a button. People pay their bills on their mobile phones. Stressed parents get to dodge trolley tantrums by swapping the supermarket run for online shopping. And let’s not mention all that free online news.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

GDP surge should not blind us to the dangers of an interest rate rise

Some on the monetary policy committee at the Bank of England are likely to press for increases, but the recovery remains weak

George Osborne has repeatedly promised to fix the roof while the sun is shining, and after official figures last week showed GDP growth picking up sharply in the second quarter, it seemed that the clouds have finally lifted.

With the Bank of England’s policymakers due to meet on Thursday, the news that the slowdown in the first quarter was just a blip sent traders scrambling to price in an interest rate rise in the coming months.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

The innovators: the personal rape alarm with a fast track to the police

Personal Guardian device fixes to clothing and alerts police to exact location of attack via monitoring station

When a woman was raped in the apartment complex where Rebecca Pick lived, the Strathclyde University student felt scared – and angry. The victim had screamed for help but failed to attract the attention of passers-by.

“It was terrible,” says Rebecca, 22, who has recently graduated in marketing and enterprise. “I thought then that we should have some way of being certain that we can get a response.”

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS

Barnaby Joyce says Trans Pacific Partnership agreement not dead yet

The agriculture minister has not given up on Australia signing the TPP and says the trade minister, Andrew Robb, is still ‘at the table’

The agriculture minister, Barnaby Joyce, has not given up on Australia signing the Trans-Pacific Partnership, potentially the world’s biggest regional trade agreement.

Week-long negotiations over the TPP ended in Hawaii on Saturday without an agreement. Sticking points for Australia are sugar and dairy, but Joyce says the process is ongoing.

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Source: The Guardian Circular Economy RSS